Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Shire, Maker of Binge-Eating Drug Vyvanse, First Marketed the Disease - NYTimes.com

Monica Seles, retired tennis star, now shilling for Shire
The big drug companies are market makers - first they help create a diagnosis, then they sell the cure.   Not that there is no such thing as binge eating.  A recently acquired box of Girl Scout cookies (chocolate thin mints) had a very brief half-life in my hands.  - gwc

Shire, Maker of Binge-Eating Drug Vyvanse, First Marketed the Disease - NYTimes.com

by Katie  Thomas

 "As Shire introduces an ambitious campaign to promote Vyvanse but also to raise awareness about the disorder, some are saying the company is going too far to market a drug, a type of amphetamine, that is classified by the federal government as having a high potential for abuse. Shire’s track record is adding to the worry: The company helped put another once-stigmatized condition — attention deficit hyperactivity disorder — on the medical map and made billions of dollars from the sale of drugs, like Vyvanse and Adderall, to treat it. In recent years, federal officials have cited the company for inappropriately marketing Vyvanse and other A.D.H.D. drugs."

The retired tennis player Monica Seles spent this month making the rounds of television talk shows, appearing on everything from “Good Morning America” to “The Dr. Oz Show” to share her personal struggle with binge eating.

“It took a while until I felt comfortable talking about it,” she said in a People magazine interview, explaining that she secretly devoured food for years while she was a professional athlete. “That’s one of the reasons I decided to do this campaign: to raise awareness that binge eating is a real medical condition.”

But that is not the only reason. Ms. Seles is a paid spokeswoman for Shire, which late last month won approval to market its top-selling drug, Vyvanse, to treat binge-eating disorder, a condition that once existed in the shadow of better-known disorders like anorexia and bulimia but was officially recognized as its own disorder in 2013 by the American Psychiatric Association.

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